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The Moel-y-Faen Tramway. These photographs conclude Mike Hodgson's record of his visit in October 2013 to the Moel-y-Faen Tramway near Llangollen with Richard Lewis..

Above: The trackbed of the Moel-y-Faen Tramway above Pendwr. Considering that this route hasn't been used for rail traffic for over a century, it is in remarkably good condition. On the left of the picture, it is noticeable how much more pronounced the autumn colours are above the valley floor. 15th October 2013. (Mike Hodgson)

 
Above: The view to the north west of the trackbed from where the picture above was taken. As can be seen, the views from this old line really are spectacular. 15th October 2013. (Mike Hodgson)
 
Left: A view down the tramway's main incline. The top half is very clear, as can be seen, but the vegetation takes over at the bottom – which is hardly surprising! Structures like this were built throughout the 19th century to lower materials from mountain quarries down to the arteries of transport in the valleys below. 15th October 2013. (Mike Hodgson)
 
Above: The remains of the engine house at Hendy Incline Top. A steam engine will have been based here to handle the raising and lowering of wagons over the steep incline. 15th October 2013. (Mike Hodgson)
 
Above: Richard Lewis sets off gingerly down the incline. These are steep old structures and, in places like this which get a lot of rain, it is not uncommon for some of the stones on the surface to have worked loose. We venture to suggest that walking down makes one's legs ache more than going up. 15th October 2013. (Mike Hodgson)
 
Above: Near the bottom of the incline, a minor lane crosses the tramway via this bridge. One wonders how many motorists crossing this bridge know anything of the transport history which lies beneath. 15th October 2013. (Mike Hodgson)
 
Above: A modern aerial view of Moel-y-Faen Quarry, parts of which have been seen in some of the preceding photographs. This image makes it clear that a lot of slate came out of this mountain in the 19th century! Incidentally, slate has a very high wastage rate, so the spoil heaps contain something like four times the volume of usable slate extracted. (Source to be advised)