Join Now

The benefits of joining Railway Ramblers are shown below. You can join Railway Ramblers online now by clicking here and filling in your details.

Alternatively you can print out the membership application form below and post it to us with a cheque or postal order.

RR-MembershipForm.pdf

You can print out our roll-fold colour brochure, which summarises our aims and activities, and sets out the benefits of membership. The rear panel contains a smaller, tear-off membership application form.

RR-Brochure.pdf

Gorseddau Tramway in Wales

Not all old railways are flat, the Gorseddau Tramway in Wales being a case in point: its gradient reaches 1 in 23, but even steeper is the short inclined plane which makes the final approach to Gorseddau Quarry. Members are seen here on a glorious October day on the ledge for the trackbed beneath the so-called ‘wailing wall’, which overhangs the tramway at an angle of 45 degrees. This was built at great expense from huge stone blocks to prevent slate waste engulfing the running line. (Jane Ellis)

Privacy Policy

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation became law across all EU Member States on Friday 25th May 2018. It provides improved privacy rights for individuals, and imposes increased responsibilities on organisations. Railway Ramblers takes the protection of members’ personal data very seriously, and the club’s Privacy Policy (a.k.a. ‘data protection policy’) can be viewed by clicking the link below.

RR-PrivacyPolicy.pdf

An Author’s View

‘Old railways provide uniquely fascinating routes through both town and country, but they remain man-made, artificial routes. Almost inevitably, one finds questions coming to mind – why does the line go this way rather than that? who travelled this route and why? and what sort of machines were in use? The more you think you know, the more the questions multiply and the more fascinating the whole exercise becomes – and I use the word “exercise” deliberately for, if railway walking does nothing else, it does get us out of the dusty archives and into the open air.’ (Anthony Burton, Walking the Line, Blandford Press, 1985)