Gallery Group – North East

Lambley Viaduct viewed from the south, i.e. heading from Alston to Haltwhistle. Described as ‘one of the most impressive railway viaducts anywhere on the Tyne’, this huge Victorian engineering feat consists of 13 spans rising to 100 ft. It was built in 1852 and restored in 1996 by the North Pennines Heritage Trust (NPHT), which now owns it. The viaduct is open for walkers and cyclists. Energetic visitors can use a stairway down to river level, where the views are even more imposing. March 2007. (Bob Prigg)
Lambley Viaduct. The intense low sunlight has bleached out some of the detail in the facing stonework, but this photograph gives a good impression of the towering scale of this structure (Bob Prigg)
Whittingham station in Northumberland was two stops west of Alnwick before the line turned to the north west to head for Coldstream. It is seen here together with its goods shed, nearly 78 years after the last passenger train departed in 1930. The scale of the building was remarkable for such a remote rural community (Bob Prigg)
A track level view of the island station at Whittingham, Northumberland. The building has survived remarkably well considering its 78 years of disuse(Bob Prigg)
A close-up of one of the booking office windows at Whittingham. The glazed and lettered bricks are a remarkable survival (Bob Prigg)
Ilderton station, viewed from the public highway along the former station drive. Given the remote rural area which it served, all of the stations on the Coldstream branch were large and lavish – 2008 (Bob Prigg)
Slaggyford was the penultimate station on the NER’s Alston branch, which left the Newcastle-Carlisle line at Haltwhistle. Photographed 2010 (Alan Simpson) In June 2018, the station reopened as part of the South Tynedale Railway. The narrow-gauge heritage railway operates along a 5-mile (8 km) section of the former Alston Line, which closed to passengers in May 1976.